Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

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Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:07 am

George, while looking for other information for you, I came across more American’s in the RCAF who were at No 9 Service Flying Training School, Centralia, Ontario.

Also note in this story he mentions another American, John Birky (which I’ve posted info on a later post on this thread)

ED HAWKES - RCAF AMERICAN VOLUNTEER
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Jack Pequegnat, my elementary instructor at Goderich, said if I had not done any previous flying I wouldn’t have to unlearn the bad habits I had picked up. He sure was a good guy, patient and very thorough in explaining and demonstrating what I was required. I remember the food at Goderich. It was out of this world. There was a great big French cook. He made fresh tomato soup. I haven’t eaten anything like it since. While training at No. 9 SFTS Centralia fellow American John Birky was killed. We were all quite startled and rather sobered by it in the fact that it could happen. Up to that time it was fun and games and we were having a good time and these are pretty nice aircraft to fly. I don’t think that death ever crossed anybody’s mind – and then bang, to have him go like that. We didn’t have too much time to think about John Birky’s loss. They really had the ground school laid out. If you weren’t in ground school you were flying. There really wasn’t time for much of anything. There was always some reading to do at night. You never seemed to be totally caught up. It was mostly just plain hard work. When I got my wings, I figured I was a number one hotshot! I sort of didn’t believe it for a while – it was just too good to be true. The biggest surprise was when I got a commission on top of that. I thought it was pretty good for a small town boy. I had a notion that Chuck Folsom, my American instructor at Centralia had been at Annapolis and had been asked to leave for raising hell. He later confirmed this. Chuck was called by his contemporaries, ‘Big Chief’. I think his method of instructing developed a close relationship between us. We’d take off for example, and he’d say, “Now this is the way to do it – you get lined up right down the middle of the runway and cage the directional gyro and set it to zero or set it to the heading – set it on ninety if you were going east or eighteen if you were going south – whatever it happened to be. This is the way you do it and this is the way you want to open the throttle – he’d do the whole thing and make a circuit and downwind bash down some flap and so on. He’d do the whole thing and then he’d say, “You go ahead and have a ‘go. I would and did fairly well at it. I think we got along. His method of teaching was don’t get excited and take it easy- nothing drastic is going to happen. It was very reassuring, really, because he certainly was the perfect personification of confidence if nothing else. He certainly could fly and fly extremely well. I think it was the non-screaming low key approach. So many other guys had instructors who would almost get hysterical. They’d get so excited if you did something the least bit wrong. I think it was pretty easy on that score simply because he was so relaxed and it just kind of “transmitted” - easy going and calm but absolutely in control of everything. We used to twit each other on account of our accents. He used to call me ‘Ayid’ for Ed. Being from Kentucky, he really did have a southern drawl. I felt as though I was treated like a Canadian, and I don’t think there is anything I can add to that. I don’t really think that there was any distinct American-Canadian association. In fact, I don’t recall that the subject of who you were or where you came from came up very often. I don’t know how it felt to wear a U.S.A. shoulder flash because mine said Canada. Without doubt, it was the experience of a lifetime. I'm glad I went. The only regret is not finishing a tour but that's pretty small stuff compared to the reason; the end of the war. If only I had gone sooner ..., if, if if!!”

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:10 am

JOSEPH HAROLD HARTSHORN - D.F.C. - RCAF AMERICAN VOLUNTEER
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When I got my wings at No. 10 SFTS at Dauphin, Manitoba, in July 1942, I thought that it had taken me a long time to become useful to the RCAF - just under a year. I looked forward to taking my new commission as a Pilot Officer and tracking directly to a front-line squadron. I had long given up hope of flying Spitfires, which had long been a dream of mine but which had suffered a shot of realism when I did my Service training on Cessna Cranes, a lovely twin-engine aircraft that pointed straight toward multi-engine bombers. My assignment to the Flying Instructor School at Vulcan, Alberta, clearly indicated a long delay along the way. I finished training there at the end of September and was assigned to No. 9 Service Flying Training School at Centralia. On the train to London from leave to my home in Pennsylvania I ran into an old friend from Elementary days, P/O Andrew Wakeman. When we got to the base at Centralia we were both assigned to A Flight, under F/L Huffman. Neither Andy nor I had ever flown the Anson before, so our first chore was to bet checked out on this new aircraft type. "Lucky" Southam, who had just been transferred from the previous location for No. 9 at Summerside, P.E.I., where the school had flown Harvards, was my teacher. He showed me around the aircraft, gave me 40 minutes of dual instruction (probably three takeoffs and landings) and sent me on my way. I teamed up with Andy to do some practice flying together and off we went. We flew west along the shore of Lake Huron and came to the St Clair River separating the U.S. and Canada. The bridge over the river, connecting Sarnia and Port Huron, was a tempting target, and we banked around to fly under it - a character flaw common to young pilots with fewer brains than flying. hours. As we roared under the bridge, we found the space was already occupied by two large freighters passing each other. With our hair standing on end we eased the Anson between them, climbed as rapidly as possible to keep our plane numbers from being noted and flew straight home, hoping that we hadn't made the first black marks on our records already! We had not; nobody reported us.Two more hours at the controls and we were ready to start on our first students in Course 61. My first students on October 9, 1942, were LACs Page, Phillips, and Deegan, who all took turns doing instrument flying under the hood. My first impression of instructing them on instruments was that I had to lean way over to the left from my right-hand instructor's seat to look at his instrument panel while controlling the aircraft with my right hand. Later on I was a good instrument pilot myself, but I wonder how good I was in those earliest weeks and months of instructing. A little while later, LACs Porritt and Jardine were added to my own regular roster. All of them had been in training since early August, and I sometimes think we were teaching each other for the next weeks. Of the students I instructed in instrument flying in Course 61, three were killed in action: Frank Breen (service number J21201), R.A. Porritt (J21202), and W.B. Jardine (J21203). At least, Deegan, who was a remustered Corporal later survived to get a DFC. Group Captain Fullerton was required to send overseas two instructors per month. We did not know how he chose those who were to go, but the rumor was that those pilots he considered the most upsetting to his station routine, such as those whose bar bills were too high, or who had appeared to stretch the station's flying orders too much, would be among the first to go. Alex Novick left sometime in the spring of 1943; Andy Wakeman left in June. I was posted overseas at the end of July. Finally I was within reach of my 2-year old journey to my goal of actually flying against a hated enemy - the Nazis. It was only a first step. As I finally discovered, I had to go through a personnel depot at Bournemouth, England, followed by an Operational Training Unit on Wellingtons, followed by Battle School, and then by a Heavy Conversion Unit where I learned to fly Halifaxes. Finally, after transferring to the Eighth Air Force, U.S. Army Air Force, I was placed on detached service with the Royal Air Force and sent to 419 (Moose) Squadron, 6 Group, RAF Bomber Command on May 2nd, 1944. It had taken me just shy of three years to directly attack the enemy directly, even though I was now in a uniform of a different color. No. 9 Service Flying Training School at Centralia seemed at the time to be a useless detour on my journey, but when I got to England I was very happy that I had spent all those hours in the air, rehearsing, in a way, for my time in much larger aircraft. And I am proud that I taught so many young men how to take care of themselves in the air. I am also glad that when they were with me I had no idea of what the deadly skies of France and Germany could do to some of them.

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:19 am

Leading Aircraftsman John Jacob Birky
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Leading Aircraftsman John Jacob Birky was one of ten American pilot trainees to commence training with the first course at No. 9 SFTS Centralia. Prior to the United States entry into World War II, thousands of Americans enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. On September 30, 1942, Birky departed from the airport on a solo night flying exercise. Shortly after take-off, Anson 7573 which Birky was piloting struck ground in an almost laterally level position, bounced, struck a fence, cartwheeled through trees and caught fire on the farm of Murray Dixon. Awakened by the crash, Dickson and John Hotson rushed to the burning aircraft and pulled Birky to safety. Birky sustained very severe extensive third degree burns of both legs and lower part of trunk with muscle layers exposed in many places. He was given three-one quarter grains of morphine at the scene of the crash before emergency crews transported him to the station hospital where he was admitted at 12:05 midnight- approximately 35 minutes after the accident. In the next eight hours, Birky was given nearly 1000 cc of blood serum. A call went out to his family in Valparaiso, Indiana informing them of their son’s dire condition. They were told by a Station official, “If you want to see your son alive, come immediately.” Birky became irrational; his pulse was thready and fast, eventually becoming imperceptible. Death occurred at 8:12 a.m. Soon after, Mr. and Mrs. Birky received another telephone call informing them of their son’s death. The entire class turned out for a service in memory of their fallen comrade. Birky’s body was escorted back to his home in Indiana by William George, a fellow American on course who was also a resident of Indiana. An accident investigation concluded that with limited night flying experience, Birky allowed his aircraft to get out of control, then crash. The investigation couldn’t determine the cause for loss of control of the aircraft. The Accident Investigation Board recommend that student pilots at twin engine Service Flying Training Schools be given a periodic check at intervals of every two or three hours throughout their night flying training. Sadly, Birky became one of almost 800 brave young Americans who were killed while serving with the RCAF during the Second World War. A special ceremony was held February 12, 1944, at No. 9 to present Murray Dixon and John Hotson with the British Empire Medal for their heroic actions in rescuing Birky from the burning aircraft. John Birky enlisted in the RCAF at Windsor, Ontario on November 27, 1941. The interviewing officer concluded that Birky was, “Good type. Ambitious. Good flying experience. Keen to continue flying and play his part.” The Chief Supervisory Officer at 12 EFTS Goderich assessed Birky as, “Pleasant, good all round type. Hard worker and has leadership qualities. Inclined to worry unduly. Night vision low average." In July 2000, Rev. Ken Birky and his wife travelled from their home in Indiana to retrace John Birky's time training at Centralia

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:22 am

JOHN WARREN ROUSSEL
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John Warren Roussel was one of seventeen Americans who graduated with Course 65. Group Captain Fullerton assessed Roussel as, “A good average pilot. Has shown definite improvement. Has always been a willing worker. This pupil is recommended for a commission." The Teaneck, New Jersey native was posted overseas. On October 12, 1943 Roussel was the pilot of a Beaufighter aircraft at No. 54 OTU which crashed while undergoing air to air target practice over the sea. Pilot Officer Roussel lost control of the aircraft in a steep turn, and, before he could regain it, the aircraft crashed into the sea. The plane sank immediately, and despite a thorough search, no survivors were found.

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 11:25 am

CLIFFORD SINCLAIR NEWTON
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Cliff Newton was one of eight Americans training with Course 67 at Centralia. The resident of Roseville, Michigan received the following assessment from S/L Houston: “A very sullen student who thinks everyone is against him. Has natural ability but won’t use it. This pupil is not recommended for a commission.” Newton was posted overseas. After advanced training he was posted to No. 9 Squadron. On October 7, 1944, while on operations (Walcheren), the aircraft for which F/O Newton was pilot, was damaged by flak on the bombing run. The starboard outer was put out of action and the starboard inner was only giving a limited amount of power. F/O Newton continued the bombing run, did a second bombing run as briefed and returned to base on two remaining engines. On November 12, 1944, F/O Newton and crew were detailed to attack the German Battleship Tirpitz, moored in Tromso Fjord, Norway. Thirty Lancasters equipped with Tallboy bombs attacked Tirpitz; with two successful hits causing the battleship to capsize. Flyin Officer Newton and crew prepared for operations to attack Dortmund Ems Canal, on the December 31, 1944. At briefing at 0600 hours on the January 1, 1945, they were allocated Lancaster aircraft NG 252. The aircraft engines were tested prior to takeoff. The pilot took off, at 0745 hours. The airfield controller saw the aircraft swing to port when well down the runway. A witness heard a falter in one or more engines as it was nearly airborne. The aircraft hit some trees and exploded. Only the bomb aimer managed to escape with his life.

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by georgetanksherman » Mon Sep 28, 2020 5:00 pm

Temujin, I had three of the chaps, Birky, Newton and Roussel, but I did not have Joseph Harold Hartshorn (RCAF No. 419 Sqdn), Edward F. Hwkes (Instructor, RCAF No. 404 Sqdn) or Chuck Folsom, (Still researching on him) he was mentioned as a fellow American with the write up on Hawkes.

Really appreciate the heads up on those three, Thank You !

Cheers
George

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 6:01 pm

georgetanksherman wrote:
Mon Sep 28, 2020 5:00 pm
Temujin, I had three of the chaps, Birky, Newton and Roussel, but I did not have Joseph Harold Hartshorn (RCAF No. 419 Sqdn), Edward F. Hwkes (Instructor, RCAF No. 404 Sqdn) or Chuck Folsom, (Still researching on him) he was mentioned as a fellow American with the write up on Hawkes.

Really appreciate the heads up on those three, Thank You !

Cheers
George
Glad I could help.. I found more info on Folsom

(J/12203) Flight Lieutenant Charles Folsom - DFC

SUPPLEMENT TOTHELONDON GAZETTE, 19 OCTOBER, 1945
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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Mon Sep 28, 2020 6:16 pm

FOLSOM, F/L Charles (J12203) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.436 Squadron - Award effective 9 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. American in the RCAF; born 21 July 1917 in Hopkinson, Kentucky, home there. Educated Kemper College and US Naval Academy. Surveyor/Contractor. Enlisted Ottawa 1 September 1941 and posted to No.1 Manning Depot. To No.6 ITS, 10 October 1941; graduated and promoted LAC, 6 December 1941 when posted to No.20 EFTS; graduated 28 February 1942 when posted to No.16 SFTS; graduated and commissioned 19 June 1942. To central Flying School, Trenton, 18 July 1942. To No.9 SFTS, 9 September 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 15 March 1943; to No.1 General Reconnaissance School, 1 July 1943; to “Y” Depot, Halifax, 18 September 1943; taken on strength of No.3 Personnel Reception Centre, Bournemouth, 21 October 1943; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 15 September 1944. Repatriated 2 August 1945; released 24 September 1945. A founding member of the National Building Materials Distributors Association, member of the National Sash and Door Jobbers Association and served on the board of directors of the Hopkinsville Electric Plant Board. Died in Hendersonville, Tennessee, 13 January 2003.

This officer has completed a most successful tour of operational duty. He has served with Coastal and Transport Commands and has completed numerous missions against enemy shipping over the North Sea and off the Dutch coast. On one occasion he destroyed two enemy E-boats, despite intense anti-aircraft fire. He has now flown on many sorties in close support of the 14th Army in Burma, operating over the jungle and mountainous terrain. His courage and determination have been outstanding at all times.


Full Name : Charles C Folsom Jr.


And since he flew with 436 Squadron, RCAF I’ll give you the history of that Squadron

No. 436 Squadron

Badge: An elephant’s head couped car­rying a log
Motto: Onus portamus (We carry the load)
Authority: King George VI, May 1945

The squadron operated as a transport unit from a base in India and adopts this badge and motto to symbolize its functions.
Formed at Gujrat, Punjab, India on 20 August 1944 (1) as the RCAF’s 33rd – second Transport, first of two in India – squadron formed overseas, the unit flew Dakota aircraft in support of the British Fourteenth Army in northern Burma. After hostilities, the squadron moved to England and provided transport service to Canadian units on the Continent until disbanded at Odiham, Hampshire, England on 22 June 1946.
Brief Chronology: Formed at Gujrat, Punjab, India 20 Aug 44. Disbanded at Odiham, Hants., Eng. 22 Jun 46.

Title or Nickname: “Elephant” (2)

Commanders
W/C R.A. Gordon, DSO, DFC 26 oct 44 – 30 Jul 45, OTE
W/C R.L. Denison, DFC 31 Jul 45 – 22 Jun 46.

Higher Formations and Squadron Locations
South East Asia Command:

No. 229 Group,
No. 341 Wing,
- Gujrat, Punjab, India 20 Aug 44 – 13 Jan 45.
- Kanglatongbi, Assam, India 14 Jan 45 – 16 Mar 45.

No. 232 Group,
No. 342 Wing,
- Mawnubyin, Akyab, Burma 17 Mar 45 – 14 May 45.
- Kyaukpyu, Ramree Island, Burma 15 May 45 – 9 Sep 45.
- 16 aircraft, Kinmagan, Burma 13-21 Aug 45. (3)
- En route to England (4) 24 Aug 45 – 15 Sep 45.

Transport Command:
No. 46 Group,
No. 120 (RCAF) Wing,
- Down Ampney, Glos. 29 Aug 45 – 3 Apr 46.
- 7 aircraft, Biggin Hill, Kent 9 Dec 45 – 14 Apr 46.
- Odiham, Hants. 4 Apr 46 – 22 Jun 46.

Representative Aircraft
Douglas Dakota Mk.III & IV (India, Oct 44 – Sep 45 (5), no Unit Code)
KG755 Q KG790 P KG794 N KG855 K KJ763 L KJ820 A KJ821 U KJ841 F KF845 V KJ858 H KJ887 J KJ956 G KJ964 T KK107 M KK113 B KK126 D

Douglas Dakota Mk.III & IV (England, Sep 45 – Jun 46, Unit Code ODN)
FZ665 X FZ678 K KG320 C KG400 T KG403 M KG448 F KG455 G KG580 J KG635 P KG659 Q

Operational History:
First Mission 15 January 1945, 7 Dakotas from Kangla airlifted 59 tons of supplies for 33 Corps at Shwebo (17.5 para dropped, 3.7 free dropped, 37.8 landed at airstrip). Note: One previous mission was flown before the squadron became fully operational. On 10 December 1944, 16 Dakotas were employed in an emergency airlift of No. 177 (F) Squadron RAF from Bikramganj to a forward area at Hathazari.

Last Mission Burma: 31 August 1945, 5 Dakotas from Kyaukpyu – 7 sorties to airlift 14.7 tons of freight, 1 ton of mail and 7 passengers. (2 aircraft collected mail at Chittagong for Meiktila, Toungoo and Mingaladon; 2 aircraft on deliveries to Kin­magan, Comilla and Alipore; 1 aircraft with freight from Comilla for Mingaladon).

First Mission, England: 9 September 1945, 3 Dakotas from Down Ampney – airlift to Paris, France.

Last Mission: 16 June 1946, Dakota KG587 ODN-L with F/L Nicholls and crew – special flight from Brussels, Belgium to Odiham with 3 passengers and 1.5 tons of freight.

Summary, India/Burma Sorties: 9806.
Operational/Non-operational Flying Hours: 31,798/4561.
Airlifted: 29,000 tons of supplies, 15,000 troops, passengers and casualties.

Casualties:
Operational: 3 aircraft; 4 air­crew killed.
Non-operational: 1 aircraft; 1 killed, 2 died of natural causes.

England
Operational/Non-operational Fly­ing Hours: 6983/2597.
Airlifted: 296.9 tons of mail, 1486.2 freight, 13,063 passengers and 3156 casualties.
Casualties:
Operational: nil.
Non-operational: 1 aircraft; 4 aircrew killed.
Honours and Awards: 1 DSO, 26 DFC’s, 1 AFM, 3 BEM’s, 11 MiD’s.

Battle Honours: Burma 1945.
(1) Although it officially came into being on this date, the unit did not receive its personnel from Canada until 9 October.
(2) In Burma, a nickname, “Canucks Unlimited,” was painted on the squadron’s aircraft.
(3) These aircraft were involved in airlifting the headquarters and squadron personnel of No. 244 Group and No. 910 Wing to Rangoon.
(4) First aircraft left Burma on 24 August and the last arrived in England on 15 September. Personnel from India and Burma were repatriated and replaced by crews newly arrived from Canada.
(5) The squadron exchanged Dakotas with its relief. No. 48 Squadron RAF, and carried personnel of No. 529 Squadron RAF back to England.

https://www.rcafassociation.ca/heritage ... -squadron/
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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by georgetanksherman » Mon Sep 28, 2020 9:48 pm

Temujin, in your story about John Bilky, it stated that
Birky’s body was escorted back to his home in Indiana by William George, a fellow American on course who was also a resident of Indiana.
I can find nothing on William George, did he not stay in ????

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Re: Additional American Pilots in the RCAF

Post by Temujin » Tue Sep 29, 2020 12:42 am

georgetanksherman wrote:
Mon Sep 28, 2020 9:48 pm
Temujin, in your story about John Bilky, it stated that
Birky’s body was escorted back to his home in Indiana by William George, a fellow American on course who was also a resident of Indiana.
I can find nothing on William George, did he not stay in ????
Found a newspaper article that give more information.......I’ll see what else I can find
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