Halifax, HX-265, RCAF 433 Sqdn

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georgetanksherman
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Halifax, HX-265, RCAF 433 Sqdn

Post by georgetanksherman » Tue Jan 22, 2019 1:00 pm

Does anyone have the info on the rest of this crew ???

Halifax, HX-265, January 28/29, 1944

Aircraft had taken off from Skipton on Swale airfield to undertake an operational flight to bomb Berlin, Germany, Aircraft was hit by flak over the target and attacked twice by an FW-190. The starboard fuel tanks were hit and leaking. Aircraft condition on return forced the crew to ditch in the North Sea due aircraft damage and low fuel supply. The crew survived the ditching and was picked up after 2 to 3 hours in the water.

Pilot: F/O J. Gray, RCAF, Survived ditching

Any and all help is much appreciated !

Cheers

Ludford 101
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Re: Halifax, HX-265, RCAF 433 Sqdn

Post by Ludford 101 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 2:54 pm

I suspect the only place the crew will be found will be the No. 433 Sqn ORB. There's nothing other than the pilot's name in Chorley's Bomber Command Losses 1944.

But it did earn a DFC for the pilot, J21518 F/O John MacPherson Gray:
This officer piloted an aircraft detailed to attack Berlin one night in January 1944. Soon after crossing the enemy coast the aircraft was hit by shrapnel. One of the tanks was damaged, causing a loss of petrol. Despite this, Flying Officer Gray flew on to the target and bombed it. During the return flight the wireless apparatus and some navigational equipment became unserviceable. The enemy coast was crossed, but some time later the petrol supply became exhausted. Coolly and skillfully Flying Officer Gray brought the aircraft down on to the rough sea and not one of his crew was hurt and all got safely abroad the dinghy. This officer set a fine example of skill, determination and devotion to duty.
And the original recommendation with a bit more detail:
On the night of 28/29 January 1944, Flying Officer J.M. Gray was piloting a Halifax Mark III on a bombing mission to Berlin. Just after crossing the enemy coast at 20,000 feet, his aircraft was hit by a chance shot of heavy flak causing loss of petrol from each of the starboard tanks. Knowing full well that he was going to be short of petrol to reach England with the normal safety margin, he pressed home his attack and successfully bombed his target.

On his return journey his navigational aids and wireless became unserviceable and it was evident that he would have to ditch in the sea before reaching the English coast. This officer calmly and coolly carried out his normal ditching procedure and made a magnificent show in the actual landing of his aircraft in that none of his crew members were injured and all members escaped to the dinghy.
Last edited by Ludford 101 on Wed Jan 23, 2019 4:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Ludford 101
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Re: Halifax, HX-265, RCAF 433 Sqdn

Post by Ludford 101 » Tue Jan 22, 2019 3:51 pm

And the ORB page.
NX265 crew 28-29 january 1944.png
NX265 crew 28-29 january 1944.png (694.11 KiB) Viewed 3010 times

georgetanksherman
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Re: Halifax, HX-265, RCAF 433 Sqdn

Post by georgetanksherman » Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:30 pm

Awesome and huge Thank You Ludford 101 !

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